Style, Beauty & Grace

African models come of age

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frican women are indeed the jewels of Africa. In 2022, the continent boldly refutes the traditional notions of one portraiture of beauty illustrated largely by the Euro standard underscored by Hollywood and Madison

Avenue since the creation of the silver screen, slick magazine covers, the TV tube, Hollywood legends Marilyn Monroe, and Elizabeth Burton, the latter, who portrayed Ptolemaic Egyptian Queen Cleopatra. 

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ALISHA IBRAHIM of Nigeria is one of Benefit Cosmetics newest pretty faces to model the company's make-up line, from ebony wax bundles, matte powder, lip stain, blush collection, brow trio, lifting wax, and other facial charms. Alisha hails from Omotosho Province in Nigeria, and her recruitment by Benefit Cosmetics reflects the growing popularity and wide inclusion of the African beauty standard in all aspects of the mainstream modeling industry.

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Through the 20th century and early into the new millen- nium, Black models did not get the same opportunities or respect as their White counterparts. Though many bergs remain to modeling parity,  very many of the ste- reotypes to Black model acceptance have melted away.

 

The evidence is the spirited reach by the largely White mainstream modeling industry for African inclusivity. Currently numerous African models walk the runways 

in multiple shows, wearing Afros, braids, Bantu knots,

and cornrows, and other natural hair styles, while adorned in traditional attire. 

 

African model authority Elaine Okoye noted, pride is resonating among the African modeling community as more in the mainstream sanctum increasingly embrace them.

 

"Rooted in pride for their customs and abundant nature, African women are known for experimenting and coming up with fantastic beauty concoctions," Okoye writes "For generations, they have added powerful, natural ingre- dients to their beauty regimens to showcase gorgeous, healthy skin and hair.

 

"Many women prepare their products at home, especially since most believe the best solutions are made from natural and organic ingredients that are grown sustainably and promote African economies," writes Okoye.

And when women do choose to purchase beauty products, they look for the same tried and genuine ingredients. Some of the most popular skin care lines preferred by African women come directly from the sub-Saharan region. Cutting-edge line Africology blends pure, natural elements to combat the toxins we regularly face. Africology facial moisturizer with SPF 15directly addresses skin damage from daily exposure to blue light and Wi-Fi frequencies."​

Beauty standard of all shades

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Jewels of Africa gorgeous as the land  . . .

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FINER THAN GOLD

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Shades of  cream, cocoa butter, honey, milk & dark chocolate

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